Bash history expansion

Setting the Bash option histexpand allows some convenient typing shortcuts using Bash history expansion. The option can be set with either of these:

$ set -H
$ set -o histexpand

It’s likely that this option is already set for all interactive shells, as it’s on by default. The manual, man bash, describes these features as follows:

-H  Enable ! style history substitution. This option is on
    by default when the shell is interactive.

You may have come across this before, perhaps to your annoyance, in the following error message that comes up whenever ! is used in a double-quoted string, or without being escaped with a backslash:

$ echo "Hi, this is Tom!"
bash: !": event not found

If you don’t want the feature and thereby make ! into a normal character, it can be disabled with either of these:

$ set +H
$ set +o histexpand

History expansion is actually a very old feature of shells, having been available in csh before Bash usage became common.

This article is a good followup to Better Bash history, which among other things explains how to include dates and times in history output, as these examples do.

Basic history expansion

Perhaps the best known and most useful of these expansions is using !! to refer to the previous command. This allows repeating commands quickly, perhaps to monitor the progress of a long process, such as disk space being freed while deleting a large file:

$ rm big_file &
[1] 23608
$ du -sh .
3.9G    .
$ !!
du -sh .
3.3G    .

It can also be useful to specify the full filesystem path to programs that aren’t in your $PATH:

$ hdparm
-bash: hdparm: command not found
$ /sbin/!!
/sbin/hdparm

In each case, note that the command itself is printed as expanded, and then run to print the output on the following line.

History by absolute index

However, !! is actually a specific example of a more general form of history expansion. For example, you can supply the history item number of a specific command to repeat it, after looking it up with history:

$ history | grep expand
 3951  2012-08-16 15:58:53  set -o histexpand
$ !3951
set -o histexpand

You needn’t enter the !3951 on a line by itself; it can be included as any part of the command, for example to add a prefix like sudo:

$ sudo !3850

If you include the escape string \! as part of your Bash prompt, you can include the current command number in the prompt before the command, making repeating commands by index a lot easier as long as they’re still visible on the screen.

History by relative index

It’s also possible to refer to commands relative to the current command. To subtitute the second-to-last command, we can type !-2. For example, to check whether truncating a file with sed worked correctly:

$ wc -l bigfile.txt
267 bigfile.txt
$ printf '%s\n' '11,$d' w | ed -s bigfile.txt
$ !-2
wc -l bigfile.txt
10 bigfile.txt

This works further back into history, with !-3, !-4, and so on.

Expanding for historical arguments

In each of the above cases, we’re substituting for the whole command line. There are also ways to get specific tokens, or words, from the command if we want that. To get the first argument of a particular command in the history, use the !^ token:

$ touch a.txt b.txt c.txt
$ ls !^
ls a.txt
a.txt

To get the last argument, add !$:

$ touch a.txt b.txt c.txt
$ ls !$
ls c.txt
c.txt

To get all arguments (but not the command itself), use !*:

$ touch a.txt b.txt c.txt
$ ls !*
ls a.txt b.txt c.txt
a.txt  b.txt  c.txt

This last one is particularly handy when performing several operations on a group of files; we could run du and wc over them to get their size and character count, and then perhaps decide to delete them based on the output:

$ du a.txt b.txt c.txt
4164    a.txt
5184    b.txt
8356    c.txt
$ wc !*
wc a.txt b.txt c.txt
16689    94038  4250112 a.txt
20749   117100  5294592 b.txt
33190   188557  8539136 c.txt
70628   399695 18083840 total
$ rm !*
rm a.txt b.txt c.txt

These work not just for the preceding command in history, but also absolute and relative command numbers:

$ history 3
 3989  2012-08-16 16:30:59  wc -l b.txt
 3990  2012-08-16 16:31:05  du -sh c.txt
 3991  2012-08-16 16:31:12  history 3
$ echo !3989^
echo -l
-l
$ echo !3990$
echo c.txt
c.txt
$ echo !-1*
echo c.txt
c.txt

More generally, you can use the syntax !n:w to refer to any specific argument in a history item by number. In this case, the first word, usually a command or builtin, is word 0:

$ history | grep bash
 4073  2012-08-16 20:24:53  man bash
$ !4073:0
man
What manual page do you want?
$ !4073:1
bash

You can even select ranges of words by separating their indices with a hyphen:

$ history | grep apt-get
 3663  2012-08-15 17:01:30  sudo apt-get install gnome
$ !3663:0-1 purge !3663:3
sudo apt-get purge gnome

You can include ^ and $ as start and endpoints for these ranges, too. 3* is a shorthand for 3-$, meaning “all arguments from the third to the last.”

Expanding history by string

You can also refer to a previous command in the history that starts with a specific string with the syntax !string:

$ !echo
echo c.txt
c.txt
$ !history
history 3
 4011  2012-08-16 16:38:28  rm a.txt b.txt c.txt
 4012  2012-08-16 16:42:48  echo c.txt
 4013  2012-08-16 16:42:51  history 3

If you want to match any part of the command line, not just the start, you can use !?string?:

$ !?bash?
man bash

Be careful when using these, if you use them at all. By default it will run the most recent command matching the string immediately, with no prompting, so it might be a problem if it doesn’t match the command you expect.

Checking history expansions before running

If you’re paranoid about this, Bash allows you to audit the command as expanded before you enter it, with the histverify option:

$ shopt -s histverify
$ !rm
$ rm a.txt b.txt c.txt

This option works for any history expansion, and may be a good choice for more cautious administrators. It’s a good thing to add to one’s .bashrc if so.

If you don’t need this set all the time, but you do have reservations at some point about running a history command, you can arrange to print the command without running it by adding a :p suffix:

$ !rm:p
rm important-file

In this instance, the command was expanded, but thankfully not actually run.

Substituting strings in history expansions

To get really in-depth, you can also perform substitutions on arbitrary commands from the history with !!:gs/pattern/replacement/. This is getting pretty baroque even for Bash, but it’s possible you may find it useful at some point:

$ !!:gs/txt/mp3/
rm a.mp3 b.mp3 c.mp3

If you only want to replace the first occurrence, you can omit the g:

$ !!:s/txt/mp3/
rm a.mp3 b.txt c.txt

Stripping leading directories or trailing files

If you want to chop a filename off a long argument to work with the directory, you can do this by adding an :h suffix, kind of like a dirname call in Perl:

$ du -sh /home/tom/work/doc.txt
$ cd !$:h
cd /home/tom/work

To do the opposite, like a basename call in Perl, use :t:

$ ls /home/tom/work/doc.txt
$ document=!$:t
document=doc.txt

Stripping extensions or base names

A bit more esoteric, but still possibly useful; to strip a file’s extension, use :r:

$ vi /home/tom/work/doc.txt
$ stripext=!$:r
stripext=/home/tom/work/doc

To do the opposite, to get only the extension, use :e:

$ vi /home/tom/work/doc.txt
$ extonly=!$:e
extonly=.txt

Quoting history

If you’re performing substitution not to execute a command or fragment but to use it as a string, it’s likely you’ll want to quote it. For example, if you’ve just found through experiment and trial and error an ideal ffmpeg command line to accomplish some task, you might want to save it for later use by writing it to a script:

$ ffmpeg -f alsa -ac 2 -i hw:0,0 -f x11grab -r 30 -s 1600x900 \
> -i :0.0+1600,0 -acodec pcm_s16le -vcodec libx264 -preset ultrafast \
> -crf 0 -threads 0 "$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S)".mkv 

To make sure all the escaping is done correctly, you can write the command into the file with the :q modifier:

$ echo '#!/usr/bin/env bash' >ffmpeg.sh
$ echo !ffmpeg:q >>ffmpeg.sh

In this case, this will prevent Bash from executing the command expansion "$(date ... )", instead writing it literally to the file as desired. If you build a lot of complex commands interactively that you later write to scripts once completed, this feature is really helpful and saves a lot of cutting and pasting.

Thanks to commenter Mihai Maruseac for pointing out a bug in the examples.

15 thoughts on “Bash history expansion

  1. Another neat option that works great with history expansion is the magic space. In .inputrc, I have:

    $if Bash
      Space: magic-space
    $endif
    

    This will do the history expansion replacement in-place on the command line after you type space. E.g., typing !!<space> will replace the !! with your last command.

  2. Wow. Just wanted to say thanks for your articles, I’ve appreciated your writing for a while now, and figure it’s well past time to do so.

    Frankly you write with an understanding of the subject matter and clarity that I can only aspire to, and it’s greatly appreciated.

  3. Useful. Cool stuff.

    For many of the places where you specifically reference a command by ID I find that interactive search of the history is a little easier. (i.e. Ctrl-R ).

  4. Working with the history is IMO as important as knowing one’s way around readline(1), these are the two things people skip the most while being extremely usefull in interactive usage!(2)

    1: man readline is a good starting point!

    2: bash, python/php/sqlite/ruby/…(interactive mode) (not zsh, readline is the reason I can’t make the switch, and I did try hard!)

    Although I am a vim fanboy, as probably most of your readers, I do use emacs style bindings intensively(via readline!) on the CLI

  5. Pingback: BASH history articles | kossboss

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You can use Markdown if you want.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>